<img src="https://img.militaryaerospace.com/files/base/ebm/mae/image/2020/08/16x9/military_artificial_intelligence_5_Aug_2020.5f29637ff0fd1.png?auto=format&amp;w=720" alt="Military Artificial Intelligence 5 Aug 2020"/>

Think of artificial intelligence (AI), and the mind often goes to industrial robots and benign surveillance systems. Increasingly, though, these are stepping stones for Big Brother to enhance capabilities in domestic security and international military warfare. OZY reports. Continue reading original article

The Military & Aerospace Electronics take:

5 Aug. 2020 -- U.S. military rivals are getting into the AI game. China has co-opted a controversial big data policing program into law enforcement, for racial profiling of its Uighur minority population and for broader citizen surveillance through facial recognition.

AI could form an important pillar of the new cold war brewing between the U.S. and China over trade, technology and geopolitical influence. From the U.S. to Russia and American allies like Israel, military researchers are embedding AI into cyber security initiatives and robotic systems that provide remote surgical support. They’re using it for combat simulation and data processing.

By 2030, a third of the combat capacity of Russia is expected to be driven by artificial intelligence, say experts, including AI-guided missiles with the ability to change target midflight. Israel has adopted a networked sensor-to-shooter system. Other countries, including the United Kingdom, Brazil, Australia, South Korea, and Iran, also are investing in research into AI-powered weapons, tanks and other armed platforms.